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on the agenda include tackling corruption, the gap between rich and poor, and concerns about the environment. and through all of this week, china's economy, through all of this, rather, china's economy continues to grow. president xi jinping and his administration are expected to introduce more reforms with the goal of achieving long-term stability. all this week we're bringing you insight and analysis with our special series, "china: road to reform." nhk world's raja pradhan is leading our coverage. he joins us live from beijing. raja? >> hi, gene. this once a year meeting is so important here in china that people in this country categorize it as its own season, the political season. npc spokesperson spoke to reporters ahead of the opening session. she talked about president xi jinping's determination to tackle bureaucratic corruption. fu says there will be zero tolerance for corrupt officials and anyone found guilty must be harshly punished. fu dismissed worries that other nations have exposed about china's ongoing military buildup. she said china believes it can maintain peace by strength
the boundary. in the political environment we are not likely to return to levels of spending favored by the most ardent defense proponents and organizations like aei on the hill or frankly in the pentagon. now the budget plan announced monday would provide $115 billion more over the next five years then sequester level funding. if it is a realistic puzzle that reflect strategic as well as the resources the department might reasonably expect to receive albeit with strong leadership and cooperation in the congress. if enacted it will help remedy some of the damage article is by sequestration albeit with continued training and maintenance shortfalls in the near term and potential cuts in the future. if the $26 billion provided by the administration's proposed opportunity growth and security fund is also approved for fy2015 the military's near-term readiness picture improves significantly. the budget plan and associated proposals divide a sustainable path towards shaping the force able to protect the nation and fulfill the president's defense strategy. albeit with some additional risk. a
environment we heard about how a lot of the coverage around elections wasn't particularly polarized. there are undoubtedly concerns around the future of where this is going to be. fragile my work is on states in general. fragile states tend to be fractured state. and we are seeing an increase in the fragmented and fractured media in afghanistan and the most fractured part of that getting quiteably significant injections of funding at the moment. if the last length -- it is the that isng for a state trying to chart its own national identity -- it is not necessarily a useful way of going. but as the media -- but the media is becoming ever more fractured and fragile. >> how solid do you think is the support that you expect to see in terms ofection governmental support for the concept of a free media? i know there was discussion recently about freedom of the press in afghanistan. >> again, when you compare it to other countries, afghanistan has had a remarkable -- has managed to create a remarkable space of freedom of media. this is because -- we should give credit to president karzai .
that they are going to be around tourism and the environment. brown infrastructure. brown opportunities to invest in the direction to bring tourists both ways through the border. a ceremony held in mexico city's towel many cattle angel my hero award the concept is that the capture was distinguished guests medallion on the key to the sixty five has signed agreements to imprint sites or services to the estimate to fall eight million mexican migrants covers all a bit lopsided release. instead kept its icy hold on much of the mountain states on monday with snow forming an attempt to struggling schools and offices closed. to make a subset of the harsh winter threatened as much as ten inches of snow by the end of the day in washington baltimore and elsewhere in the meat atlantic region school systems in baltimore washington in many suburban areas but close as roll smithsonian museums. except for the national and space museum. more than two thousand one hundred flights in the notice states the council on monday according to the gym and prayers. as chancellor unto them will visit israel relations between
on top of it a light sensor, suddenly you are responding to the environment. what we do is make the kits and we see this consistently, people buy the kits and then come back and buy another kit, then they come back and buy individual bits. >> what's the repeat customer rating? >> right now between 15% and 20%. it's something that we continue to try to grow. obviously a lot of the first two years of the business have been about building the core customer base and the core product line. >> when i think of lego, one of the interesting things about it, they run their manufacturing operations and have amazing quality control. you can take them from this year and they still work with legos 50 years ago. do you worry about because you're open source someone else could take your designs and manufacture them more cheaply? >> we have a very balanced kind of approach to open source where we trademark our name and still hold patents for the connector and the system in general, so ultimately if you want to make something you want to call little bit compatible, it would have to come after being vetted
in the environment, who knows what the next eight months will bring. >> fair enough. candidate recruiting is everything. i remember various conversati s conversations. i know on one hand you've had people that you've had conversations with, that have said, you know what, talk to me in '16 when they think it will be more democrats, knowing democratic voters, hillary clinton at the top of the ticket, the shutdown, it got you a few candidates you didn't think you would get because of the environment change in that small period of time. but have you found that you still are struggling getting some people off the fence because they'd rather run in a presidential year? >> no, not at all. in fact, you went through the list. what unifies these top-tier candidates right now is the fact that they are problem solvers. you know, we didn't have to recruit many of them. they recruited themselves because they'd had it with the shutdowns, with republican recklessness and irresponsibility. they are problem solvers in battleground districts. this is our initial rollout. there will be more. we'll have a ve
dispute settlement procedures and rules and enforcement of new obligations upon environment and labor. now, let me turn very quickly to the ttip negotiations. i have a little lesson that i can say on this because they are at an earlier stage of negotiations. though they are also important because the transatlantic economic relationship is our most significant commercial relationship. it's not our most significant trade partnership. the tpp actually is more valuable in that front, but we are talking about over a trillion dollars of two-way trade in goods and services between the united states and the european union, and over $4 trillion in foreign direct investment in each other's market. so it is a huge, huge adventure. the ttip negotiators seek to eliminate tariffs and substantial reduce nontariff barriers in trade and investment. that's a traditional part of the agenda. but as miriam noted, there's also ambitious goals with regard to coordinating or harmonizing regulatory policies affecting trade in goods and services. and that's what the biggest payoff could come very hard to estimate t
stepped in. >> this is a way of ensuring a warm, welcoming environment judgment-free, so that families can come and relax and have a good time and not worry about how the person on the spectrum is going to behave or what other people might think. >> reporter: lisa is director of accessibility programs of the theater development fund. the nonprofit organization coordinates performances like these four times a year. the mission is to make live theater more accessible to diverse audiences. here are some of the things you'll see at an autism friendly show that you wouldn't see on broadway otherwise. ushers have about 30 extra helpers on hand. they hand out colorful stress relievers called manipulative to help autistic audience members to relax before and during the performance. they make the autism friendly shows as close to the regular shows as possible. audio levels are reduced by about 20% and strobe lights are completely eliminated. yet organizers say it's what's happening offer stage that truly makes this broadway performance unique. the usually empty lobbies are transformed into spaces f
the current situation. given the environment, obviously this is having a serious effect here in ukraine. we have heard in late-breaking news or in late evening news that the ukrainians are so concerned about this that they're moving security forces up to the border in areas in the north and the east of the country, not in crimea, so clearly, the ukrainians are very afraid about a larger conflict with russia, not just crimea. >> i was fascinated because i hear these people in the crimean region speaking to our reporters. you're fluent in russian. these people who are speaking in crimea are speaking in russian versus those in kiev speaking ukrainian. >> absolutely right. i mean, there are long standing relationships between russia and ukraine. there's a sense of pride in this part of the country, signs are not in russian, they're in ukrainian, a different letter alphabet. certainly in crimea, predominantly they do speak russian. language is a big issue and it's been made a big issue by the russians themselves, because there's been a plan to make ukrainian the official language and push russia
of the political environment. they are not becoming friends with the u.s., but they do want to reach a deal with them. >> tell us more about that political and by amendment. organizations must take into account what politicians are saying to their own populations. on the domestic political landscape. the situation in iran, does it allow for a deal at the moment? >> in the sense that this majorityrepresents a of the support of the population. what is at stake are the radical conservatives who are against the deal. they are still very powerful in some editions of parliament and other institutions. they are trying to do anything that they can to stop this policy. thethe supreme leader, for time being, wants to go on negotiating with the u.s.. >> broadly we know what a permanent deal might look like. iran would increase enrichment to a certain level. right now they are enriching uranium at five percent rather than 20%. in exchange for lifting economic sanctions. as a researcher and specialist on this issue, what is the nitty-gritty that you are looking for? what is the sticking point? >> in a s
environment rich with new vocabulary. >> we use big words in here all the time because we are constantly communicating with them about their day. >> for parents, the cost of sending her here is well worth it. >> we wanted to take money that we might've spent on other things and invested in their education. it is not just education, but it is the sense of socialization, and i think it ultimately gets these kids ahead at a young age. >> that on the other side of town, a world apart, they are doing the dishes together. she has seen a change for the better in her daughter, who has started chatting more. >> before i did not give her the chance to express herself. i would be doing most of the talking. now, i give her a chance to express herself, so she does not get frustrated and angry. >> it has already helped some in their daily lives. i can loves her books, tell you, and hopefully that will help her chances. that brings us to a close, but you can continue watching us on our 24-hour news channel. thanks for watching. >> funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation,
in that environment was not correcting the problem. it was enhancing the problem. >> reporter: they hemmed to write georgia's juvenile laws. they say they're better off being rehabilitated in their home where rather than being influenced by older hardened offenders. >> what we found out a lot of these children coming into the system were not really bad children. they were doing dumb things. so we wanted to find a better way of treating them under the local level. >> reporter: georgia is following states like texas and louisiana by diverting juveniles to community-based programs. >> runaway or possession of alcohol, rather than having those children detained, is there there are interventions that will happen between the youth and specific state agencies to get to the underlying cause. >> reporter: a new commission is in charge of making sure that the programs are consistent and effective scenario across the s. the state also believes they will save a lot of money in this change. the community based programs the governor said will cut the costs to $3,000 a year. the laws will prevents judges from acc
room in a portfolio for equities in an environment of low rates, even if they're going higher, they're going higher in a very slow fashion, if you want. growth is subdued but is still supportive. so that's overall an environment where you want to be in stocks. >> you know, you're the big picture type of investor, and the big picture for the u.s. market for the last four years has been all of the easy money policy from the federal reserve and plenty of people feel like that's why we are sitting at all-time highs right now. so why wouldn't it reverse itself as the fed begins to pull back on the easy money and even if it starts to raise interest rates sooner rather than later, why isn't this a time when the market starts to retreat, where are we still going higher now? >> well, i think although, you know, we're expecting a normalization of rates at some point in the future, we're not talking about something very quick or very drastic. and at the same time the world is healing from its traumatic experience, if you want, from the crisis. so all of this is supportive. now, actually, clear
agree that an environment of low rates, low interest rates, especially when it p prevails for a long time, and we have had a long period of low interest rates can give rise to behavior that poses threats to financial stability. and therefore we need to be looking at that very carefully. and we are doing so in a very thorough way, i believe. there are a number of things that we are monitoring. measures of asset prices and whether or not they appear to be diverging from historical norms. namely it's hard but trying to spot any asset price bubbles that might be emerging. we're looking at leverage, which build up in leverage can be very dangerous to the financial system and pose stability risks. we're looking at trends in leverage. we're looking at credit growth to see whether or not that has potentially worrisome trends. in addition to that we're looking the particularly through the stress tests at financial institutions and a low interest rate environment. we have to worry about whether or not they're appropriately dealing with interest rate risk ls. we have been looking at that and, i
is confronting a new regulatory environment, and we have our banks against the wall confronting audit as well as our stockholders. >> right. lou: by the end of the year, what kind of economy here? how much growth? we saw the fourth quarter revise again. what do you think it will be this year? >> i think by the end of the year we're going to be a solid 3%. that kind of assumes that all the pieces fall in to place. lou: yeah. there's that caveat. we appreciate it. greg miller, sun trust. we're delighted to see you. >> my pleasure. >>> up next lou dobbs to be the. we're going hollywood. stay with us. >>> a record-breaking year at the box office films bringing in all-time high 10.9 billion last year, and now they're looking to take home hollywood's top honor sunday. here to break down the top oscar contenders and likely winners is host of the television show -- great to see you. >> great to see you, too. >> let's start with "gravity." i find the movie a fascinating idea. the great stars. does it win best picture? >> it certainly is considered one of the runner of-up for best picture. out in inter
into the wrong hands in the middle of a very volatile security environment? >> mr. chairman, in lebanon, much as we have in many other countries, we have an office of defense cooperation in beirut. their primary purpose truly is to ensure that we have the appropriate safeguards, and that were performing the appropriate end-user monitoring is what we call it when we provide foreign military sales of equipment, partner nations. so our u.s. personnel in the office of defense cooperation in beirut will do that and enhance end-user monitoring to ensure that that equipment is both accounted for and being used properly. >> i found it interesting in the dialogue with the lebanese armed forces their take on the saudi arabia and french potential for receipt of saudi arabia and assistance to purchase french military assets. they said they liked the was equipment a lot better, basically is what the lebanese armed forces was saying. but i gather from your testimony, general, you do like the more partners the better, the more systems the better. you don't find that saudi arabia provision of 3 billion to pu
, this is a different environment. ukraine's far different. we never got involved militarily in georgia, but there were limited options we had like bringing the best georgian troops back to fight the russians. >> you did have george w. bush face a similar situation. you don't think he should have gone in militarily, aggressively start some war. this president is not doing this. i don't understand how the critique is -- wouldn't you agree the president is handling this situation as it hits his desk right now, appropriately? >> i think we can't go to war. that's very clear. there's no military option here. so i've tried to stand with the administration and say in congress tomorrow we're going to talk about sanctions. eliot's done a good job leading that with ed royce. i think we need to take the fact that america in 2020 will be the leading world energy producer, so let's talk about that being used to be an offset to the russians because their energy is their weapon. if we're looking to make russia a pariah state, that's where the president needs to be talking. >> listen, i think there's a lot to be said
such as entities committed to protecting and preserving our nation's environment natural resources or the communities that could be directly impacted by such activities. to be clear, i strongly support the rights of industry to have an opportunity to provide comments on proposed rules. it fosters more informed quality rulemaking and benefits both business and broader society. indeed, that's why our current administrative procedures mandate that a public comment process be conducted to allow any individual or corporation to participate and provide input and feedback in an equal, fair and open process. that's current law. the amendment that congresswoman duckworth and i are proposing today would simply ensure that all participants in the rulemaking process be provided equal consultation rights with agencies. for example, as the ranking member, mr. cummings, noted earlier, if the u.s. department of agriculture were to have a rule in an effort to protect the health of everyday americans, our amendment would ensure that not only the agribusinesses but also food safety experts, children'
everybody else. and this makes for a very toxic environment. i think for everybody going into november. bill: you agree. >> absolutely agreeing. in fact that is one of the reasons why the obama administration are positioning themselves on the side of the people for fairness, for redistribution against the republican party, bill, that has no narrative. that has no arguement. that just says no. bill: back on this poll, quickly. 25% of the democrats expressed that disappointment. >> i think they should. bill: are they disappointed in him and his policies or think he is not liberal enough. >> some say he is not liberal enough. others say they are disappointed in his policies or result of his policies. the fact that there is gridlock and no progress. bill: thanks to both of you. >> thank you. bill: 40% of independents are not happy. >> right. bill: that is really -- >> harbinger of ill for the administration. bill: thank you, doug. thank you, monica. what's next, martha? martha: coming up the poet giving a kiss to a little admirer. why the pontiff's mini-me caused quite a sensation in st. peter's
commitments to sustain that. it is the question of what the ifc and the world bank called enabling environment. there's not a shortage of money. they are enormously wealthy. they are regional investors. they would like to put money in, but can they trust in the rules of the game and the rules of law to do that. minerals are not going to be a magic bullet, but oil and gas resources that are being discovered recently are quite immense. inis not inconceivable that 10-15 years, they can more than underwrite the cost of sustaining said -- sustaining stability. in conclusion, let's move from thinking of quick fixes and magic bullets to understanding that peace and stability and governance were at the heart of peace and stability. it is the many small wins that will deliver this for afghans. the question is can the politics deliver something that the middle 90% of afghans who order and law and want that feature -- and want that future can realize it. you very much, andrew. it is a great pleasure to be here. i want to join you and others in thanking u.s. ip and others in sponsoring this. it is humblin
it is a question of what the ifc in the world bank called the enabling environment essentially the trust of businesses and there's not a shortage of money. there are enormously wealthy afghans in regional investors who would like to put money in but the question is can they trust in the rule of law to do that? the rules that govern the extract is section particularly. there will not be a magic bullet that the oil and gas resources being discovered recently are quite immense and it's not inconceivable that in 10 to 15 years they can more than underwrite the cost of sustaining stability and services within the country. so in conclusion i think let's move from looking for quick fixes and magic olefson understanding peace and stability and governance will be a key part of the stability and rather than a victory or deal that will deliver for afghans and the question can the politics deliver that 90% of afghans who believe and law and order and what that future can realize. >> david. >> thank you very much and it's a great pleasure to be here. i join you and others in thanking usip, voa and us
. and the second problem has been the environment for safety of media workers is not that, still not good. there's still a lot of intimidation going on, particularly when cases become personal. and then those who are covered will go after the media workers and start -- [inaudible] we have had examples of in this the past. and the thursday -- the third problem has been lack of sufficient education in the area of investigative journalism among afghan media workers which is a pity because in afghanistan which corruption makes a huge problem, there's a huge need for investigative journalism. >> you know, that segways to another subject. let me ask you about this, james, and it's sort of our business in a way and also the business of mr. anzar here which is state broadcasting, you know, government broadcasting. mr. anzar's rta is moving to more of a public broadcasting model and changing the way they think about their work. i guess the question for you and i and maybe others in the room here, what's the appropriate role for the bbc and voa and other international broadcasters that also broadcast into
to do business, free or open more business friendly environment. >> having somebody like kuchar go out and say something we have been trying to say, what he did last night was more powerful times 20 of anything we have ever said. >> can i show you something from last night that is not anywhere near as powerful as that? joe biden may be the most frequent visitor to the fastest seven. he never failed to entertain when he hits a podium. last night, no exception. >> i told the president next game i have him. just remember, i may be a white boy, but i can jump. >> thank you, joe, speaking at a black history month event. kg. >> you know, he has a certain ch doesn't he? poor guy. he get a pass. what do you expect from him? it's going to turn into a plan. if you expect him to not put a foot in the mouth or both feet and both hands at the same time, please. >> i have to guess if it was someone on the right who said that -- >> that's not the terrible thing that he said. he called the voter i.d. bill proof of racial hatred. his quote was about proponent of the voter id bill. these guys never go a
to selected researchers and human rights activists in 100 countries. media independence, the environment in which reporters work and transparency, to affect news gathering. this year fin hand, the netherlands and norway lead the list. but the u.s., regarded by many as the world's leading democracy, ranked 46, one rung above haiti. sandy baron questions the low rating for the u.s. >> i think overall american journalists have very powerful protections, not the least of which is the general respect for rule of law in this country. the general respect for free press. >> a lot of people looks at the united states as a model. there need to be some improvements regarding the way the journalists and their associates are able to do their jobs. >> well, in fact some investigative journalists are saying that news gathering is becoming more difficult, especially when it comes to reporting national security issues. tony. >> randall pinkston, thank you. >>> antigay policies in russia is one of the issues, rosalind jordan, before i hack up a lung here. >> people who were protesting against their govern
sit-in on the environment in a generation. consumer advocates at the environmental working group are warning that a chemical used to make yoga mats and flip flops can now be found in more than 500 food items. the chemical azodicarbonamide is often used in bread, croutons, pre-made sandwiches and snacks made by brands including pillsbury, nature's own, sara lee, kroger and little debbie. the restaurant chain subway recently announced it was phasing out the use of the chemical after an online campaign. the chemical is not approved for food use in australia and europe. and fernando gonzalez, one of the members of the cuban five has been released after mother 15 years behind bars. he was transferred thursday to an immigration prison pending deportation back to cuba. havana,er spoke in praising the release of her son. >> for the cuban people that have been fighting for a long time for this return, it is also a victory. convicted, and later of espionage. they say they were not spying by trying to monitor violent right-wing exile groups. three others remain in prison. and those are some
regulatory environment, and we have our banks against the wall confronting audit as well as our stockholders. >> rht. lou: by the end of the year, what kind of economy here? how much growth? we saw the fourth quarter revise again. what do you think it will be this year? >> i think by the end of the year we're going to be a solid 3%. that kind of assumes that all the pieces fall in to place. lou: yeah. there's that caveat. we appreciate it. greg miller, sun trust. we're delighted to see you. >> my pleasure. >>> up next lou dobbs to be the. we're going hollywood. stay with us. if you've got copd like me... ...hey breathing's hard. know the feeng? copd includes emphysema and chronic bronitis. spiriva is a oncdailinhaled copd maintenance treatment that helps open my obstructed airways for a full 24 hours. spiriva helps me breathe easier. spiriva handihaler tiotropium bromide inhalation powder does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms. tell your doctor if you have kidney problems, glaucoma, trble urinating, or an enlarged prostate. these may worsen with spiriva. discuss all medici
of the new media environment. the consumer is a much more in control. you just have to wait to be spoonfed when of the major networks wanted to give you. now there's this rich cornucopia, and your biggest challenge is to sit through the vast array of information available to you. it is there if you want to find it very -- it. the: we're talking about president and his 90 minute conversation with vladimir putin. i think vladimir putin views barack obama? guest: how shall i put this? i think he holds him and minimal high regard. warning sign that he was start taking him lightly was in september 2009. it was september 17. on that fateful day, barack obama made a unilateral decision, without insulting his allies that he was going to and the program that had been developed under the previous administration to build missile defense systems in the czech republic and poland, two of our strongest allies. the czech and polish government had really gone out on a limb and sacrificed a lot of credibility and prestige. their product -- they thought tremendous little battles to get these bases approved c
tomorrrow. and we promise to keep it that way. driven to preserve the environment, csx moves a ton of freight nearly 450 miles on one gallon of fuel. what a day. can't wait til tomorrow. >>> perseverance pays off. texas high school football player michael aramirez threw a hail mary catchi. and he did it. >> of course. showing everybody in class. everybody is high fives. don't forget your real friends. >> promise is a promise. as soon as he asked me, i said yes and so i'm sticking to that. i'm there. >> love it. he plans to wear a red, white and blue texas attitude's dough. >>> are you one of those obamacare, quote, liars? jacob says my rate increased a whopping 42%. daniel says now i have no coverage and running out of prescriptions soon. thank you for sharing. you are real people. that's it for us. fox news sunday is up next. before we go, might not realize it, but the competition for best original song is where a lot of the drama is for many reasons that the year's oscar, but in part because of a buzz surrounding a song that parents and kids everywhere can't get out of their head
. cinches --ed light sensors. scanning the environment much like a dolphin would but without a click. creating a 3-d map by bouncing infrared light off of everything, making to one half million measurements every second. accelerate, car can brake, or swerve without being told to. is autonomous. >> there is a long way to go in that, though. probably the next big step is cars talking to cars so that the cars can communicate road conditions, safety conditions. i suspect that the technology will be there before the legislation and drivers are ready to accept it. how people feel being overtaken by a car with someone not driving. >> ford aims to have them on the road in the next few years. >> as i just said, we will carry on the conversation tomorrow, the geneva motor show kicks off with plenty of great coverage for you. gm, joining us early on. all the major ceos joining us to tell us what impact the business is seeing when it comes to the ongoing situation in ukraine. 20 minutes to go until "surveillance" and tom keene joins us from new york. amazing market reaction to what we're seeing
in that environment. we have learned through a variety of approaches things that we probably didn't expect would be now in front of us this soon. for instance, what are the hereditary factors involved in this disease? it clearly runs in families. we have gone from knowing sort of one risk factor for the late onset type of alzheimer's disease to now depending on who you ask 19 or 20 that we have. that number is growing. in fact, it will be growing rapidly this coming year in part because of the fy-'14 appropriation because we're expanding our ability to do that kind of genetic analysis. we have gone from understanding that amyloid was a player to understanding a lot more about tau and to be able to look at pathways in the brain that are really quite complex and point to other sort of nodes in those pathways that are really important and might be drugable. we have gone from having a few clinical trials focused largely on advanced cases of alzheimer's to what you heard about today, where we now, because we can make the prediction about high risk, start the treatment earlier. just like people have o
. and the idea that we would have created an environment that is hospitable is outrageous. it's not just putin, it's going to be the people's republic of china. even if it's not in cahoots with put putin. >> it seems like the president and the secretary of state keep lecturing putin, that they have a 19th century mentality, this is the 21st century. he made a speech where -- in which he says the great power conflict is a thing of the past. i want to ask you about these words the president uttered many listen to this closely. >> those countries that are large like russia or china, we have the kind of relationship with them we're not getting into conflicts of that sort at least over the last several decades, there's been a recognition that neither country benefits from that kind of great power conflict. the kind of national security threat we're going to confront, their terror threats, they're failed states, the proliferation of deadly weapons. >> it looks like vladimir, when you listen to those words, vladimir didn't get the memo on this, and it seems to me when you add that together with man c
was saying, i want to be fair to the russian people consuming this in that controlled news environment, we're not saying that if you're buying the putin view of this, you know, that that's just -- you're just being dumb. i mean, there's a lot of ways in which he presents this that can sound reasonable if you hear nothing else. >> absolutely. and this has been one of the most amazing things of the putin project since he's come to power. he's created this kind of alternate reality. at first he did it domestically. when you're in russia, it's incredibly. the talk of democracy, the posters on the streets, the people out at also ryes, the lines at election booths. these are things that the kremlin orchestrates very, very carefully. this is the first time he's moved beyond his borders to do it there. so this is a very controlled campaign. it's a theatre. >> james welcome back to the show. thanks for joining us again. >>> coming up, vladimir putin's political machine. and later, breaking news from texas. wendy davis has become the first woman since anne richards to win a primary for governor of t
the planet but that's cool. you're in a region like the middle east where multiproliferation environment where everybody hasn't policy and nobody trusts anyone us. that is the most unstable environment. that was "open range." the hero goes into the town and there are 14 side in town. one person starts shooting and everybody starts shooting everybody else. if you have a nuclear-armed middle east that is the must dangerous situation imaginable. that is the great fear. but i can absolutely tell you that is where we're headed. nobody has a plan to get away from that. these negotiations will not only not stop the nuclear program, they will insure that the next president will have even more difficult challenge keeping iran from going nuclear. that is one of the, the greatest legacy of this administration. sir? >> ross kaminsky from boulder county and lpr 2005. one of the big things we'll hear in the upcoming primary season, john mccain versus rand paul. how should americans think about what foreign engage amentses, what foreign entertaining fellments are actually in our national interests vers
with the veterans' bill. that's the simple truth. what i hope very much is in this extremely partisan environment the fact that we have a congress that is virtually dysfunctional. i would hope that on this issue of supporting those people who sacrifice so much for their country, supporting their families that we could for this moment, at least, rise above this absurd level of partisanship. and i hope that we will. i hope we can get some republican support for the bill. >> one final question, senator. assuming the iran sanctions part is stripped out and not part of the bill, there are some oh who are worried about the cost of these expanded benefits for u.s. military veterans, health benefits, education benefits, social service benefits, all sorts of other benefits. and they say the country can't afford that right now. to which your reply is? >> if you can't afford to take care of your veterans, don't go to war. these people are bearing the brunt of what war is about. we have a moral obligation to support them. >> simple answer to the point. senator, thanks very much for coming in. you'll keep us
wage, unemployment benefits and the environment. so the do nothing congress held a hearing yesterday entitled enforcing the president's constitutional duty to faithfully execute the law. the intent was clear, attack the president. and it was held in the judiciary committee which has your diction over immigration. here was lots of discussion. this is where the president has power to temporarily suspend the deportation of people who came here to the u.s. as children. apparently when the president stood just over there last month and delivered his state of the union address saying he would use his pen and phone to take executive action where the congress was taking no action, well, they didn't go over well for this do nothing cock. look, i know it's easy for republicans to blame obama and why they can't do reform this year. but you have to keep it connected to reality. you put your principles for immigration reform on the table. you call them standards, and there was some things i liked and some things i didn't. but what i said was, good, thank you, it's a nice start. let's sit down and
in these young men. and the only difference is that i kbru up in an environment that was a little bit more forgiving. >> congressman elijah cummings joining us right now, a democratic congressman from maryland. i know you were there in the east room of the white house, congressman. take us inside for you personally what was it like to hear the president really express these kinds of emotions? >> i tell you, it made me feel emotional, wolf, as an african-american man who was once an african-american boy. and to see those young men standing there. but the fact is that not only did the presidency himself in those boys, wolf, he allowed those boys to see themselves in him. and that is very, very critical. and that's the part that's been missing. we've got a president who has been elevated to where he is. but a lot of those young boys probably felt at some time this was unreachable. by him allowing himself to be seen, that is, to strip himself and let them know that he had been through what they had been through, i think is made a tremendous difference. as a matter of fact, one of the young boy
different? >> no. it's the same environment. everything is the same. just -- like i said before, 12 years in the nba, not a problem, not an issue. year 13, not a problem, not an issue. same old, same old. >> that's it for me. i'm brooke baldwin. "the lead with jake tapper" starts right now. >>> the white house warns russia not to do what russia may have already started doing. i'm jake tapper. this is "the lead." the world lead. it's playing out like a tom changes see thriller. ousted ukrainian president viktor yanukovych breaks his silence and vows to fight for his country's future as russian troops are spotted. the politics lead. flashback friday. withheld pages from the clinton presidency is released and shines new light on hillary clinton. >>> and the buried lead. actor seth rogen calls out washington, d.c., for not calling out something that is important. seth rogen live on "the lead" today. good afternoon, everyone. i'm jake tapper. we're going to begin, of course, with the world lead and armed men who may be tied to the russian military who have seized control of two airports
had this sort of disembodied environment where there was no real connection and people anecdotally were telling people, yeah, i was sitting on the brim for four hours, whatever. now you are hearing emergency phone calls that are directly related to the tie-up on the bridge and then you layer over top of that the political shenanigans of some really stupid people who decided to have fun and games at the expense of all those commuters and this thing takes on a whole different feel for people on the ground, which is why i think the poll numbers may shift a little bit more as these tapes get more airing and people hear that anguish and that anger on the bridge. that's gonna translate in poll numbers and that's something i know the christie people are going to be concerned about. >> you know, steve, the governor finally got a question or a couple of questions at the -- at his ask the governor forum earlier this week. and i want to play a little bit of sound from that because christie's tenacity has not abated at all. let's take a listen. >> i'm not gonna give into the hysteria of questi
cigarette how well the market did in an environment that's been as anti-business as i have ever seen in my lifetime and i think that what you were just saying is absolutely true. i see this more as a spring that's wound up and ready to be unleashed. imagine where we would be if we had a president that was reaganesque that freed up capital, ended up launching new businesses for a new world. so all of that can very well happen and the fact is it can't get any worse in the last five years. >> it's coming, jack. one of the signals. stock market is telling you, the political situation, policy situation they are talking flat taxes now, they are going shut down this obamacare, it's coming jack. keep the faith. thanks to boston you gentlemen. now it was five years ago that the tea party was born. will that movement rebond with the rest of the gop and hand republicans control of the senate in november? we'll talk about that next with our political panel. please stay with us. turn aroun♪ ♪ every now and then i get a little bit hungry ♪ ♪ and there's nothing really good around ♪ ♪ turn ar
wants these countries to look to russia for guidance on what to do on the international environment, and he also wants to re-create or create some kind of an economic union, but he certainly doesn't want responsibility for internal problems that a lot of these countries have, especially their economic problems. >> so even though he said the worst thing that happened in the history of the 20th century was the collapse of the soviet union, you believe that if he thought he could re-create the soviet union, he would want to because of all the problems that would go with that, especially economic? >> he just wants those countries of the near abroad, most of all ukraine looking to russia and as part of an arrangement with russia, not part of the arrangement with the west. he wants to avoid them establishing stronger linkages with the west and he wants them to have much stronger linkages with russia, where russia actually has some measure of control. >> charlie: and he says that specifically in part, does he not? >> well, yeah, i think -- he's a typical autocrat. he's made no secret of wh
with a tight budget environment here. there are a lot of republicans who don't like the idea of giving any foreign aid right now. they don't like having to explain back in their home districts. >> peter cook, thank you for the latest on that. >> western nations are talking sanctions on russia. russia is talking sanctions of its own. in the middle, companies doing business in ukraine and russia. are hundreds of companies involved. not just pepsi, coke, mcdonald's. companies that have big grain shipping operations near the black sea. stock prices are holding an but that this not mean there are not effects. procter & gamble has been in ukraine since 1990. pampers, panty and -- pantene. three weeks ago they said because of currency fluctuations they were cutting their 2014 earnings forecast. they said emerging-market toctuations lead the company cut its 2014 earnings forecast by as much as a percentage point rat. >> that may make it even worse. >> caterpillar invested a billion dollars in russia. they were the first blue-chip company to issue rubles nominated bonds. is not just these companies
states. dina cappiello, the national environment reporter for the associated press, joins me now. 27 1/2 million dollars in finds, $200 million for the cleanup. in the range of penalty, how does this rank? >> it's the biggest ever for a company that violates its water pollution permits. other companies that paid big fines in the past in 2008, the e.p.a. said this is the biggest ever for a company that violated permits it had from states. >> ifill: describe the pollution. >> we're talking about 6,000 violations over 300 state-issued permits, hundreds of streams, tributaries and rivers, 79 active coal minus, over 20 coal processing plants where they put the coal and wash it before it's shipped, over five appalachian states, so it's a pretty massive coverage area for the settlement. >> reportersettlement. >> ifill: how did the discharges occur? >> they're actually piped into the waterways and states issue permits for the companies that give them certain limits and in this case this company repeatedly from 2006 to 2013 exceeded those limits, that they were actually authorized to discharge.
, could do to the environment. the protesters say the risk of oil spills and the destruction of wildlife outweigh the potential benefits of creating a few hundred jobs. we'll have more coming up in a few minutes on something else that's tied to our addiction to oil, climate change. plus, some background on why we call it that, instead of global warming. stay with us for that. and don't forget to join the conversation with fellow reider fans on twitter, facebook, instagram and keep telling us what's important to you. no two people have the same financial goals. pnc investments works with you to understand yours and helps plan for your retirement. talk to a pnc investments financial advisor today. ♪ >>> yet another massive winter storm barrels across the country after dropping torrential rain in the west and slamming the midwest it dumped snow and ice on the east coast. thousands of flights are canceled and hundreds of thousands of school kids are getting yet another snow day! yay! and federal workers in washington are also getting a snow day. their fourth this winter. all of that causin
difference is that i grew up in an environment that was a little bit more forgiving. when i was their age, i was a lot like them. i didn't have ad in the house. and i was angry about it even though i didn't necessarily realize it at the time. i made bad choices. i got high without always thinking about the harm that it could do. groups that have had the odds stacked against them in unique ways that require unique solutions. groups who've seen fewer opportunities that have spanned generations. the worst part is that we become numb to these statistics. we're not surprised by them. we take them as the norm. we just assume this is an inevitable part of american life instead of the outrage that it is. [ applause ] >> and i -- and i believe the continuing struggles of so many boys and young men, the fact that too many of them are falling by the way side, dropping out, unemployed, involved in negative behavior, being pro filed. so we need to change the statistics. not just for the sake of the young men and boys, but for the sake of america's future. and that's -- that's why in the aftermath of the
with a disability, that they can do that in a tax-free -- i should say a tax-advantaged environment and so they can save over time and do it in a manner that doesn't put them at a disadvantage from a tax standpoint down the road. so sara is a great example of why the able act should pass, and she is doing more than her share to make sure that it does pass, so i'm grateful to sara wolfe for doing that. especially grateful to people like sara who like a lot of us at some point in our lives have to overcome the tragedy. sara lost her mother connie not too long ago to a sudden and rapid illness, but she has been able to -- to deal with that tragedy and still help us day in and day out to get the able act passed. i will highlight one more story and then i will conclude. angie king is a 28-year-old who lives in indianapolis, indiana, and like sara wolfe, she lives with downs syndrome. she has had -- angie has had five different jobs and works five days a week. she works paid positions at kohl's on mondays and at the ymca on fridays. on tuesdays, wednesdays and thursdays, she volunteers for several organi
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